The CoCreate Podcast

Mission-Driven Businesses With Priscilla Velasquez

September 02, 2020 Nicole Salvatore Season 1 Episode 3
The CoCreate Podcast
Mission-Driven Businesses With Priscilla Velasquez
Chapters
00:01:17
Introducing Priscilla Velasquez of Mayan Wave
00:03:07
Babes In Business!
00:04:15
Weaving In Guatamala
00:06:58
Nurse to Entrepreneur
00:08:20
Women Helping Women Starts With...
00:10:12
Women Weavers and Collaborators
00:10:48
Asbury Park and Guatemala
00:11:53
Balancing Business Needs During The Pandemic
00:13:05
Mission Driven Businesses: We're All Connected
00:13:48
Fair Trade Partners
00:14:15
Slow? Keep Going
00:15:28
Your Customers Are Waiting For You
00:17:23
Mayan Wave and The Mission
00:19:16
Fair Trade: Learning From The Maker
00:20:54
Fair Trade Is Giving Back
00:21:56
The Mayan Wave Difference
00:23:09
How To Get Started With Fair Trade
00:24:23
The One Woman Show and The Mission-Driven Business
00:25:46
Who Are Your People
00:26:48
The Market Style of Selling
00:27:56
Getting Creative and Joining Forces
00:30:23
Inspired Moments
00:31:19
How To Find Mayan Wave
The CoCreate Podcast
Mission-Driven Businesses With Priscilla Velasquez
Sep 02, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Nicole Salvatore

Priscilla Velasquez is a registered nurse and the owner and founder of Mayan Wave, a company she established in 2018. Priscilla began Mayan Wave by working out of her apartment in Asbury Park, N.J. 

Mayan Wave curates quality, colorful, hand crafted mayan goods. She’s started with handbags, travel accessories and is expanding to home decor. She aspires to open a brick and mortar in the future but for now you can find her products online and at local markets near Asbury. All  of Mayan Wave’s pieces are handmade by women weavers and Mayan Wave supports women artisans in Guatemala through fair trade.  Priscilla’s mission is to give back to the less fortunate and there’s no doubt that's exactly what she’s doing.

Priscilla and I spoke about what it means to create mission driven businesses that are capable of empowering women across the globe. We also dove into fair trade practices, inspiration, and creativity. And I couldn't be more grateful to her for sharing her mission-driven business guidance with all of us.

You can find Priscilla on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/mayan_wave/) and the Mayan Wave website ( https://www.mayanwaveusa.com/

By signing up for her mailing list at mayanwaveusa.com you’ll be notified of the newest inventory and charitable work Mayan Wave is doing for the women weavers.

Use promo code “STAYSTELLAR”  for a 10% discount on all beautifully handcrafted Mayan goods.
It applies to ALL items in your order. Promo code may be used multiple times by the same custome and are effective until the end of September 2020.



Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Priscilla Velasquez is a registered nurse and the owner and founder of Mayan Wave, a company she established in 2018. Priscilla began Mayan Wave by working out of her apartment in Asbury Park, N.J. 

Mayan Wave curates quality, colorful, hand crafted mayan goods. She’s started with handbags, travel accessories and is expanding to home decor. She aspires to open a brick and mortar in the future but for now you can find her products online and at local markets near Asbury. All  of Mayan Wave’s pieces are handmade by women weavers and Mayan Wave supports women artisans in Guatemala through fair trade.  Priscilla’s mission is to give back to the less fortunate and there’s no doubt that's exactly what she’s doing.

Priscilla and I spoke about what it means to create mission driven businesses that are capable of empowering women across the globe. We also dove into fair trade practices, inspiration, and creativity. And I couldn't be more grateful to her for sharing her mission-driven business guidance with all of us.

You can find Priscilla on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/mayan_wave/) and the Mayan Wave website ( https://www.mayanwaveusa.com/

By signing up for her mailing list at mayanwaveusa.com you’ll be notified of the newest inventory and charitable work Mayan Wave is doing for the women weavers.

Use promo code “STAYSTELLAR”  for a 10% discount on all beautifully handcrafted Mayan goods.
It applies to ALL items in your order. Promo code may be used multiple times by the same custome and are effective until the end of September 2020.



Nicole Salvatore :

Welcome to the CO create podcast. I'm your host Nicole Salvatore, a beach bum and aspiring dog mom who left her windowless office job to start a copywriting business. I said hell no to burnout and now I spend my days connecting with amazing women, many of them copywriters just like me, for creating businesses they don't crave a break from. And that's exactly what we're going to help you do on this podcast. Help you co create amazing experiences with your clients and design a life that's nothing short of stellar will welcome copywriters, creators and straight up inspiring women as they share their sparks of insight, their go to marketing moves, and the mindset shifts that mattered most to them and their business. So whether you're looking for those business strategies you've been put into action right away, or you just need a kick ass pep talk from someone who gets it. You'll feel right at home here. And I can't wait to help you and your business. Stay stellar. Let's go Priscilla Velazquez is a registered nurse and the owner and founder of mine wave, a company she established in 2018. Priscilla began mine wave by working out of her apartment in Asbury Park, New Jersey. Mine wave curates quality, colorful handcrafted mind goods. Priscilla started with handbags travel accessories, and is expanding to home decor. She aspires to open a brick and mortar in the future but for now she can you can find her products online and at local markets near Asbury. All the mind wave pieces are handmade by women weavers and mine wave supports women artisans in Guatemala through Fair Trade Practices. Priscilla's mission is to give back to the less fortunate, and there's no doubt that she is doing exactly that. my interview with Priscilla touched on so many things that are at the core of mine waves mission and vision, including creativity, fair trade And women supporting women in business. It was an amazing experience for me to interview her after knowing her for a few years. And I know that you'll get so much out of this particular interview, if you happen to be someone who's dreaming of building a business that supports other people in their quest to live their purpose as well. So, without further ado, here's my amazing interview with Priscilla. Hey, Priscilla, how are you doing? Fine, Nicole, thank you so much for having me. Of course. Of course. I'm so excited for those of you who haven't met Priscilla yet. We're gonna dive in to everything that I can get into one podcast about her about her brand mind wave and all the things that I think you bring to our community and for those of you haven't met for soul yet, like I was saying, we met through the local organization called babes in business. So I feel like that's like a nice place to kind of start Do you mind if we start there? Absolutely.

Priscilla Velasquez :

Absolutely all about women empowerment. So I'm excited. Awesome, of course, so so you're an RN? Before you know before mine wave came along, you were an RN? And did you how did you find your way from that world into being an entrepreneur and do they coexist right now for you, or how does that look right now? So right now, because of the pandemic, I'm focusing on nursing. Fortunately, my wave is on the side right now. It's a very tough time to be a business owner. But it's amazing how the women are coming together. The brands are mixing up the girls are getting in touch, and it's amazing to see how we are joining together for on the same mission. The meetups are still happening. So that's a great thing for us. Absolutely. Absolutely. So how did mine wave like how was it born? It's like the baby business. But how did that come to be? So the weaving in Guatemala is very unique to any other country. And women solely do the art of weaving. They are the breadwinners, they are the poor families living in the villages, underneath the lakes in the mountains, you know, their education level is very low. The main language in Guatemala is Spanish, but they make out their own language. So it's based on giving back it's based on doing a missionary work in in you can say, as a nurse to help keep the trade alive, and give them money to keep working hard. Awesome. No, that's fantastic. And do you find yourself in Guam? Well, I guess this is a great question pre pandemic, but have you found yourself heading there often, more often now that the business is going and what does that look like? Like, so I am Guatemalan, and my grandmother has since passed. Her name is Matilda, dad. And she has left the home there. And I think that's probably when my idea first came about. I grew up with mine weaving my entire life. My whole home is decorated with colorful, colorful designs. And so it was natural to me all the hard work and that the women were the one doing it was something that I admired and knowing that my grandmother did this for a living. I explored it. I've met with a lot of artisans. And since then, I have lost my sister to the pandemic. 41 years old, her mother, my grandmother's name is Nativity debt and so as my sister so we got the Matilda dads

Nicole Salvatore :

in mind with everything moving forward. Absolutely, absolutely. And I can't, I can't even begin to express help. Sorry I am for your loss and I know that a lot of the the pieces that you've been presenting and the purple that's been coming through, I just kind of see her in that and I didn't know if you wanted to speak to that at all. You have purple is February where my sit the month that my sister was born and, and being purple as her favorite color, trying to focus on all things purple. Awesome. They're stunning. Aside from that, they're also stunning, which is fantastic. One of the things that I wanted to kind of pick your brain about is you know, I know for me, there were a lot of like little things that and we were talking OFF AIR about this just a little bit. There are a lot of things I take from counseling and psychology as I write and as a coach, and I'm wondering if there are things you've taken from your life as a nurse and carried over into the business that you're building and what that what that evolution has been like for you and for your business. So we're recently working with a pharmacy everything is really coming together nicely for mind wave because

Priscilla Velasquez :

have life health care has always been an issue in America and all around the world. So we are giving money directly to local pharmacies because very common illnesses, the medications have to be ordered, and they're not stocked like our American pharmacies. So with the nursing knowledge and working with pharmacies, that's where a lot of the money is going back. So a portion goes to the artisans and another portion goes to local pharmacies in the city of Guatemala. Oh, that's amazing. That's awesome. So one of the things that that I was wondering off, was, you know, as we, as we think about being women in business, and that opportunity to give back presents itself or doesn't and we go after it, and we chase it, right, we go down and go get it for ourselves. I think that sometimes women helping women starts in our minds, and the

Nicole Salvatore :

way that we create our community together. So if there's anyone out there who's feeling you know, who, who's feeling like what am I supposed to do next as they start their business? What's one thing that you would tell them that you know now about having to navigate being a woman in any business but in your business in particular, taking your time and explore options? Not being fearful of rejection? I feel like this. getting the word out is is the hardest thing. I think you have a lot of ideas in your head, and how we how to put them to action is probably the hardest part about all business owning. We're very fortunate here in Asbury Park to have a very tight knit community of women business owners and that's amazing because I there's not many towns that have a woman's group like that. Yeah.

Priscilla Velasquez :

seeking help, I think just seeking help from other experts. I am lucky, I can go back to Guatemala. It's where I'm accustomed to. And I can speak to them to what I'm interested in bringing back to the states and they work with me and quite easy to to get the ideal customer here in the US is where I'm focusing all my energy. Yeah, no, that's interesting. You say that, because I was thinking, Oh, it must be quite an adventure to it must be quite an adventure to head over, and then communicate and say, This is what I this is what I'm envisioning for this piece or this this, you know, this pattern or this approach? And what does your collaborative process look like with the women who are weaving for you? What does that look like? So there's like a group of women that actually do the work and then there are another group of women that are working Working with us directly like the fair traders, so they're back to the education. They don't have as much education to negotiate anything with me. But again, it's a woman's groups over there. They're called collaboratives. And they all work together on the process of making a bag. So we never really spoke about what product I'm bringing back. So I'm bringing a lot of handbags backpacks, travel things, fanny packs, and slowly working my way into home decor because there are clothes that you can bring back. There's a lot of weaving projects all across the country. And yeah, I just feel like it's very similar to where I live where the where my weave is working through Asbury Park being huge in this if it resembles Guatemala, so much with the outdoor markets and the women working together. So I just meet With them through email, and when I get a chance to get to see them in person, which would be like maybe twice a year. Oh, wow. Okay, that's no, that's phenomenal. So, you know, as we're taping, I don't even know if anyone says taping anymore taping guys.

Nicole Salvatore :

As we're taping we are in, I always say the pandemic isn't over just because you're over it. we're taping in the middle of a pandemic. And as you said, like that travel, that travel piece is not always going to be the easiest thing right now to do. So I'm wondering, you know, with the current circumstances, how have you been able to kind of balance what your business needs and what you as a person, especially considering what's going on during this pandemic for you and your family? How have you been able to kind of meet that challenge? And have you found a balance between this is what my business needs for me and this is what I need for myself. What's that looks like? That is a very tough question.

Priscilla Velasquez :

directly involved 360 in this pandemic, personally, working as a nurse at a local hospital it's it's a very tough time in my life My business is very personal my work is very simple. And I'm in a tough spot right now but I think that we should all move on I you know, it's really advise to proceed with our goals and they're just going to move a little bit slower but we must not stop in our mission. This is a cycle. I don't buy my and wave, you know, products. I don't buy weaving from the women. The women don't have money. During the pandemic. There was many donations made hundreds of dollars just donated to feed them when We were in quarantine, they were also in quarantine and relying on food. Here we have grants and and there, there's there's none of that. So my mission is to continue buying from them, working with them, keep them working. So everybody's happy. So I'm excited to see America open up. I can't wait to see Guatemala open up, that's going to be a slower comeback. But you know, I think that with the fair trade business, I'm glad to see there's a lot of fair trade peers that I have that are moving forward. I belong to a community where we're all you know, continuing to work with them. And you know, deliveries are very slow, International. Anyway, but now with our mail being interrupted. We're getting back slowly. Yes, and I think to your point

Nicole Salvatore :

That slowness, I think sometimes can be frustrating when you are a business owner, especially if you're a fledgling, you know, I don't know what the nice way to say if you're a new business owner or new ish business owner, that slowness can be challenging. I'm going to go with challenging guys. But I think that that patience piece is kind of what we need right now. Just to continue as you as you alluded to, to continue to move forward. Even if it is slowly toward whatever then the next step is like don't not allowing ourselves to neglect our goals simply because it's going to take us longer, perhaps, to arrive there, then it would under I don't like the word normal but typical circumstances. So I don't know if that resonates at all. But that patience piece is just a little wait. Absolutely patience. Very hard, but we have to focus on the goal and in mind wave we are helping other people.

Priscilla Velasquez :

And they're counting on us, if you could, you know if that could be a term, they're, they're waiting for our business, they, you know, they want us to help them. They want to help us. It's not easy to stop production. Yeah. And I think that's such a profound idea is that that you just mentioned is there waiting for us? I think sometimes, and this I see in the copywriting field is, you know, I don't want to bother anyone. I don't want to I don't want to overwhelm people with my message or with my mission or with my idea or my concept or my product, or service. But honestly, people are waiting. And I'm so glad that you mentioned that because people are waiting because if, if they've I don't know, if you've had this experience, if they're buying from you, there is something there's an energy exchange, there is a there is something that they are getting from that experience of supporting the mission that you're bringing into the world. And I think, you know, they're waiting for us to do these things. We can't let anybody

Nicole Salvatore :

Down simply because it's hellish sometimes.

Priscilla Velasquez :

It's okay to use that word. Yeah.

Nicole Salvatore :

You know, yeah. So I think that's uh, I love that you said that Priscilla because the the the concept of there waiting for us kind of brings me to this idea that you had mentioned when we first started chatting today. And that's that idea of like the one of the hardest things is getting your message, mission, service or product out there. So I wanted to talk a little bit about what marketing and getting that that message and mission out there has looked like for you and how it might have changed and evolved over time. Yeah, so our primary way of communicating with our customer is the market. In Guatemala, there's markets you walk around, there's a certain population this customer that wants to shop with mine wave is

Priscilla Velasquez :

Looking for the mission of giving back? The appreciation of craft handmade? Hmm. We all know that if you buy something handmade, it's likely to last a lot longer versus a machine. You know what you're getting. It's just more of a durable product, then mainstream big company product. So when we go out to markets, there's, there's freebies, there's always freebies at my table, there's, you can touch and feel and smell. And no charge. People are amazed. They're they just the colors, draw them over to our tent or table or booth. And that's how we get the word out. That's really how we get the word out. Yeah, fantastic. Yes, smelling smelling mine wave items at local markets is actually free. But it doesn't smell it smells different when it's not made in a multi level factory. It's wholly different. Cotton, but we are working with leather also. There's a special smell of leather. There is yes. And that actually kind of perfectly segue. So I appreciate it. It actually perfectly segues me into talking about this idea of fair trade. I always think of fair trade, and you far more an expert than I certainly, but I always think of fair trade as future weaving for other people like you are allowing them the opportunity to do something that is going to sustain some sort of business in some way. So I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about that fair trade process and what what differentiates that from other ways of doing business you are learning directly from the maker that really is, you know, unfortunately I'm not that talented to do the backstrap weaving if you ever get a chance to observe how fast almost like a knitting process when you see a woman, you know, in the corner knitting like nothing like how are they counting the stitches and how are they you know, they're having conversations during the process. It's amazing. So I don't do that work. I do appreciate the talent. I appreciate the nature where they actually get the cotton cotton trees and they are dying. They are dying in the cotton with natural vegetables. So I think that the Fairtrade process is really understanding the work that it takes and understanding that they need us to help them spread the word So I'm looking for your help work and you know the word in my work, and they need me to spread the word of their work, and it will help, you know, keep a safe environment in the workplace. So the money is clean money. I don't know how to say that, you know, it's such a way it's, it's earned money. It's reliable. So the maker the the money, it's a I just keep saying recycling, they recycle, we recycle by helping them it's just the fair trade is giving back. That's that's what it is and knowing who you're dealing with directly and where the money is going. Yeah, and I think that knowing the where the money especially right now, knowing where your money is going and that it is going to allow someone to have that you said Well, I believe we're used was like, relax. Right. So it's reliable and it's not. It's not a sense of detachment from the process of carrying a bag.

Nicole Salvatore :

To like the person who created that for you, I think that there's there's less of a detachment. Then I went over and I went to TJ Maxx and I picked up a bag and I ran out, you know, well, no, I pay for it first guys, but you get the idea. You know, I just went over there and they had 72 of the exact same bag, and I don't know who made it, where it came from and who, who got paid if anyone to make that for me. I don't know if that resonates but like, I don't know what happened to make that thing that I'm picking up. But when I work with you, and I make and I buy something from mine, we've I know, at least at least at my core, I know like I can feel good about doing that. You hit it on the nose, Nicole, knowing who who made it, the hard work. I don't want to get into you know, the

Priscilla Velasquez :

sweatshops and things but that's really where I am avoiding and just working one person you the old fashion, small business, working with small business and trying to make it a bigger sustainable company. Yeah, absolutely. So if there's someone out there I always like to imagine what the audience is doing right now besides like, hopefully driving in a car or you know, sitting in the tub listening or something. But if there's someone out there listening and they want to maybe either start a business and have a Fairtrade element in their business, or they are a business that creates a product and they would like to move toward using sustainable and fair trade practices, what kind of guidance might you offer them? I would see what what's the target? What are you interested in who you're interested in helping should I say? What is going to be sustainable. Move forward, never go out of fashion, I feel vintage things that maybe we don't see anymore that we want to bring back. That is kind of where I'm focusing on bringing old traditions back or keeping traditions because we see there's a lot of disconnect with person to person. So I feel like getting back to our roots looking into things that are, are dwindling away and bringing them back. You know, starting slow, it's okay to be a one a one man show, right?

Nicole Salvatore :

I hope so. I otherwise I'm in trouble

Priscilla Velasquez :

so far, so it's just a you're your own boss. Yep.

Nicole Salvatore :

Well, and I think to the other thing, too, that one woman show idea is like, I am a one woman show. However, there are all these people who believe in whatever it is that I'm doing. Like there are people listening to the podcast who are going to go out and like, just, you know, scroll your website and pick out all the things that they want and you know are going to be part of your mission now. So yeah, what one woman show for sure. And then also backed by all the other women who believe in the mission and the vision that is being created by whatever it is that you offer or sell, which is why I'm always like, don't be afraid to sell something. Because it's not a bad thing. Like it's not a bad thing to sell this because you're actually there's gonna be a whole crew of people who are into it. Absolutely. Yeah. And I have loved to see that on my journey of you like vintage you like colorful one lady told me it reminds me of in the 70s when tie dye and very colorful things that a lot of people say

Priscilla Velasquez :

that it just reminds them of their childhood and not Really where I was going with this but it's funny how colors mean a lot to people and being in Asbury Park by the beach in the summer which I think that and then they can't just going into the spring and going into the nice weather we didn't get employed in the beginning but now is the time and the colors are really popping out colorful people people that want to be bright and shiny thing people and people that want to you know reminisce about you know, Woodstock those are the people that are looking for me and they want to be Earth conscious. Should I say well, I don't want any waste, recycled fibers, fabrics, cotton, everything that's natural. Absolutely. And I think that that's so important. So if if you are listening to it

Nicole Salvatore :

Gus, it's so important to know who your people are. Even if they surprise you like, Oh, this reminds me of Woodstock and you're like wait what? Huh? Thanks Priscilla. Okay. It might surprise you who they are but knowing who they are allows you to better I don't know if this makes sense to you for so like, knowing who they are allows you to think about them as you're creating.

Priscilla Velasquez :

Absolutely, absolutely. Yeah. And the market style of selling you you have that you make the connection with your buyer, and that's priceless. I, I love to tell the story I like to like we just reiterating again about the touching and the feeling and it's it's priceless. One day I'd like to open a brick and mortar but right now we're solely online and diving into those markets and I can't wait until I feel comfortable and I can get back to To the women in Guatemala with new products, it's hard to deal, you know, through the internet, but we will get new products. And we will get out there to be the customers again. And we're excited about that. Now that'll be wonderful. Absolutely. And I wonder, because I think that everybody has that creative moment. And hopefully, hopefully you guys get the creative moment in your day. So I'm wondering what, what your creative process looks like for mine wave. And if there's other ways you find yourself getting creative, that have nothing to do with the business. I think when you're starting a business, that's all you think about being creative. I think it's just joining forces with another business owner. I think exploring what's out there. You don't want to mimic what somebody else is doing. imitate it. You really want to be your own creativity. So I just walk the boardwalk of Asbury, and I look around and I see what the common trends are and try to inspire to bring something my end that would attract the customer further, I just walk with my dog and my boyfriend on the boardwalk and just try to get inspired with that my nursing job is is enjoyable at times and very stressful. So I think this is my way out. This is it's funny, my business is my relaxation. Yeah, it's it's a worry free. I love I love exploring it and I can't wait to learn each design has its its meaning and I think that's where I'm going to move forward into what each stitch And really dig into that. I think that's my next step.

Nicole Salvatore :

So cool. So cool. The business as the layout is such a, it's such a unique perspective, but it's also something I think will resonate with a lot of people. Because if you have a job and I had the windowless office counseling job so I, there's there were times when that was enjoyable too. But if you can see that, this other thing that you're bringing to life is allowing you to get creative to do those boardwalk walks. And yes, of course, it's awesome to walk with the dog and it's fantastic. But also if you hit if something just hits you, in a way it never hit you before that feeling I think that's that's such a valuable experience. Such a cool, like such a stellar experience. I'm gonna use the word guys I did so but, but I think that I take your point to this idea of I'm doing what I would normally do, but I'm allowing the creativity and the inspiration to hit it.

Unknown Speaker :

Besides that it's going to What haven't I done? What should I do? colors in the sky? It's really very simple. Like, colors are nice. And then, you know, I might see catalogs. They do. So with the cooperatives, they do have managers, they have people that are helping them market at a very low budget, but they will send the fair traders, myself, my peers what the women are working on placemats table cloth, tablecloths, and then the bags, so I looked through that and I'm like, Oh, that looks like something I saw today. So very colorful person always was. That's fantastic. Yes. So I am just so excited. I'm like, I'm gonna go on and hop on Priscilla's website and by all the things

Priscilla Velasquez :

before the summer is out, and I like you know, I go

Nicole Salvatore :

back into my cocoon. So if anyone else is feeling that way, too, how can they get ahold of you? And how can they find mine way? So I have a website, it's in the process of getting updated. It's mind wave usa.com. And you could also follow me on Instagram. So that's at myon underscore wave. And those are the main places you could find my work. We're running promotions. If we're heading back to Guatemala, definitely keep you up to date with that. And I'm always open to suggestions. What did you see what did you didn't get a chance to buy? What is your favorite color? My new favorite color is purple. And I'm not I don't think I'm giving any spoiler alerts. If you guys look in the show notes for this episode, Priscilla was nice enough to give us a promo code that's good through the end of September 2020. So check the show. notes for that. When you do you'll, you'll find her Instagram link which I will link and you'll find her website link, which I'll also share with you guys in the show notes. Priscilla, thank you so much for hopping on today. I appreciate it. Thank you so much Nicole. interviewing me. It's much fun I very uplifted Awesome. Awesome. All right. Thanks Priscilla Don't forget, stay stellar and you get 10% off. Awesome. Awesome. So excited. I'm gonna hop off and do that now. Alright, guys, have an awesome day you know what to do? Check out the show notes and I'll talk to you soon. If you're looking to get your hands on some amazing mind wave pieces and support mine waves mission and vision. Through their fair trade practices and all the amazing things they do in our local community and around the world, especially in Guatemala. You can head over to the show notes where you'll find not only their Instagram link, but their website, and when you sign up for the mine wave mailing list at mine wave usa.com You'll be notified of the newest inventory and charitable work that mine wave is doing for the women weavers that create their pieces. You can use promo code, stay stellar, all one word, all caps for a 10% discount on all beautifully handcrafted mine goods, it applies to all items in your order. And you can use that code multiple times, even if you're the same customer buying multiple times throughout the month of September 2020. So if you're listening to this in September of 2020, head over, use the code stay stellar. Enjoy your discount and enjoy supporting an amazing business with a phenomenal mission. And until next time, you know what to do guys, stay stellar and I'll talk to you soon

Introducing Priscilla Velasquez of Mayan Wave
Babes In Business!
Weaving In Guatamala
Nurse to Entrepreneur
Women Helping Women Starts With...
Women Weavers and Collaborators
Asbury Park and Guatemala
Balancing Business Needs During The Pandemic
Mission Driven Businesses: We're All Connected
Fair Trade Partners
Slow? Keep Going
Your Customers Are Waiting For You
Mayan Wave and The Mission
Fair Trade: Learning From The Maker
Fair Trade Is Giving Back
The Mayan Wave Difference
How To Get Started With Fair Trade
The One Woman Show and The Mission-Driven Business
Who Are Your People
The Market Style of Selling
Getting Creative and Joining Forces
Inspired Moments
How To Find Mayan Wave