The CoCreate Podcast

Unbro Your Business With RJ Lewis

August 14, 2020 Nicole Salvatore, RJ Lewis Season 1 Episode 1
The CoCreate Podcast
Unbro Your Business With RJ Lewis
Chapters
00:02:54
How Words Propel Your Business
00:07:37
Making SEO Make Sense
00:08:28
Creating Unbro'd Businesses
00:09:39
What Your "Brand" Really Is
00:09:54
Meet Web Developer Dick
00:11:48
Individualizing You Business Systems
00:14:54
Boss-ing On A Budget
00:16:53
Murphy's Law and Your Business Systems
00:19:00
The Wise Woman's Club
00:19:00
Rethink Email As Project Management
00:20:19
Choosing Your Business Tech Is Creativity In Action
00:23:30
The Horse That Should Be A Unicorn
00:23:58
Developing a Remote Business Culture
00:26:14
Boss Leveling Your Business To Fit Your Life
00:31:02
Womxn Pricing Our Work= Women Knowing Our Worth
00:33:24
Boss Level You Biz With RJ Lewis
00:33:24
Allowing Your Offers To Evolve
00:36:47
How To Connect With RJ
The CoCreate Podcast
Unbro Your Business With RJ Lewis
Aug 14, 2020 Season 1 Episode 1
Nicole Salvatore, RJ Lewis

RJ Lewis is an army wife and mother of 3 living in the Richmond area of Virginia.

For more than a decade she’s helped companies of all shapes and sizes design and optimize their customer experience, product delivery systems, technology stacks, marketing playbooks, knowledge management, and collaborative processes and spaces.

Her company, RJ Lewis Digital, is a business experience development consultancy that is helping CEOs like you grow their business to the BOSS Level. Videos and social media posts are all fun and sexy. But WHAT'S HAPPENING BEHIND THE SCENES IS GONNA MAKE (or break) your company BANK.

So, what did RJ and I cover in our interview? 

Well we dove into our mutual twin-like love of words, CRM, customer experience creation, copywriting, authentic communication, building a business that respects your life, the de-bro-ifi-cation of SEO, and everything else for that matter, and of course RJ’s secret sauce: Aligning your business back end so you can keep cocreating amazing experiences with your customers. 

RJ is a powerhouse and her and her knowledge and experience is unparalleled. 

She also happens to be a stellar person to talk to and  so I’m beyond stoked to share this interview with you because I know you’ll get so much out of the things RJ shared with us.

You can follow RJ at @talk2rj and find her at https://justrjlewis.com/ 

Don’t forget to check out RJ’s Boss Level Business VIP Bundle here: https://justrjlewis.com/blb-vip 


Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

RJ Lewis is an army wife and mother of 3 living in the Richmond area of Virginia.

For more than a decade she’s helped companies of all shapes and sizes design and optimize their customer experience, product delivery systems, technology stacks, marketing playbooks, knowledge management, and collaborative processes and spaces.

Her company, RJ Lewis Digital, is a business experience development consultancy that is helping CEOs like you grow their business to the BOSS Level. Videos and social media posts are all fun and sexy. But WHAT'S HAPPENING BEHIND THE SCENES IS GONNA MAKE (or break) your company BANK.

So, what did RJ and I cover in our interview? 

Well we dove into our mutual twin-like love of words, CRM, customer experience creation, copywriting, authentic communication, building a business that respects your life, the de-bro-ifi-cation of SEO, and everything else for that matter, and of course RJ’s secret sauce: Aligning your business back end so you can keep cocreating amazing experiences with your customers. 

RJ is a powerhouse and her and her knowledge and experience is unparalleled. 

She also happens to be a stellar person to talk to and  so I’m beyond stoked to share this interview with you because I know you’ll get so much out of the things RJ shared with us.

You can follow RJ at @talk2rj and find her at https://justrjlewis.com/ 

Don’t forget to check out RJ’s Boss Level Business VIP Bundle here: https://justrjlewis.com/blb-vip 


Unknown Speaker :

Welcome to the CoCreate podcast. I'm your host Nicole Salvatore, a beach bum and aspiring dog mom who left her windowless office job to start a copywriting business. I said hell no to burnout and now I spend my days connecting with amazing womxn, many of them copywriters just like me, who are creating businesses they don't crave a break from. And that's exactly what we're going to help you do on this podcast. Help you cocreate amazing experiences with your clients and design a life that's nothing short of stellar will welcome copywriters, creators and straight up inspiring women as they share their sparks of insight, go to marketing moves, and the mindset shifts that mattered most to them and their business. So whether you're looking for those business strategies you can put into action right away, or you just need a kick ass pep talk from someone who gets it. You'll feel right at home here. And I can't wait to help you and your business Stay Stellar. Let's go

Nicole Salvatore :

RJ lewis is an army wife and mother of three living in the Richmond area of Virginia. For more than a decade, she's helped companies of all shapes and sizes design and optimize their customer experience, product delivery systems, technology, stacks, marketing, playbooks, knowledge management and collaborative processes and spaces. Her company RJ Lewis digital is a business experience development consultancy, that is helping CEOs like you grow their businesses to the boss level. Videos and social media posts are super fun and sexy. But what's happening behind the scenes is gonna make or break your company bank. So what did RJ and I cover in our interview? Well, we dove in to our mutual twin like live love of word the Debro-ification, that is a real word, of SEO and everything else for that matter. And of course, our secret sauce aligning

Nicole :

your business back end, so you can keep co creating amazing experiences with your customers. RJ is a powerhouse and her knowledge and experience is unparalleled. She also happens to be a stellar person to talk to honestly. So I'm beyond stoked to share this interview with you. Because I know you'll get so much out of the things that RJ and I shared on the podcast. But I also know you'll probably just fall in love with her too. So let's dive in. So I am beyond stoked to be on this call with you. Let's just like start off with that. How are you? RJ: I am awesome. I am awesome. I got up this morning and you literally are my entire day. Well, that's pretty rad. I love that. So if any of you guys are out there wondering how I met this amazing woman RJ and I met in Rachael Rogers program, we should all be millionaires. And if you're not in there, I don't know what you're doing with your life. But like I we found out that we're both we just kind of both love to geek out on words and language and mindset work. So if it is cool RJ for you like kind of start there? RJ Yeah, yeah. I would love to start with what is it that LaTondra calls it? word hoes? Yeah, I think we're both in that category like so yeah, so one thing I know you're stellar at, you know, it's like the person sees in themselves and they see it and other people like, is using language to propel your clients, businesses and your own business because your copy is just found calm but where did that love of like words and wordplay and kind of that that desire to use words in your business? Like where does that come from for you? RJ: For me, it came from just growing up my grandmother. She was not an English person. She was actually a nurse, but she was very much a stickler about the nuances of the English language. So if you said things that were grammatically incorrect, or anything she would be like, on it about the corrections. Right. And definitely, if there were words that came up that you didn't know, she was all Get the dictionary. We had the entire Encyclopedia Britannica and several dictionary. So my love of language definitely came from there. And just once I got into business, applying it and learning how it applies in terms of just being able to invite people into your space and be authentic, you have to be able to communicate, you know, and that's all language. Yeah, I was actually you read my mind, which I'm not.

RJ/Nicole :

But like this, it happens. We are twins. For those of you who can't see us right now we are twins. That's a really good segue into my other questions like, how does that show for you in your business or in the ways that you work with other people in their businesses like their challenges that you've seen them overcome by just changing the way that they're talking to their people? For me, I guess since my business is so very tech based, it started with me just being able to attempt to communicate and a lot of people who are

RJ/Nicole:

My clients would be non tech. So I would have to bring it to a place with analogies and with just the use of my language in a way to make them understand the concepts that I was trying to explain and the things that I was trying to do in their businesses. Right. So then that for me, became a, not a pivot so much as just a, it showed me the importance, I guess would be that I wanted them to also be able to do the same thing and to show that same kind of attention or attentiveness to their users. They're their customers, their clients. Yeah, yeah. And do you find that whether when you were first starting out, or even like now, do you find that the way that you attract clients to your business like in particular has shifted because of the way that you've been able to? I don't like I don't like the idea of like dumbing down but

Nicole/RJ :

Like, I don't know, some, like some of the things that you've taught me, I'm not familiar with the technical terms for them. Like we were talking offline about CRM and things like that, like, I'm still learning. So I found that shifting your language for them is is beneficial or is it? It's kind of like it when everybody wins, or how does that look for you? RJ: It is an everybody wins because it's it's an educational piece that pays off. Like, I can get them to understand very quickly, you know, when I'm talking about CRM, and they're like, wait, what's that and CMS and things like that, and they're going Okay, first of all acronyms Second of all, what the what you know, so then they are able to really understand and translate because a lot of times, people when you're an expert and you're in your zone of genius, you're like, I got this and I'm just trying to help you come along with me on this ride, but it's the understanding that they can

RJ :

Come along with you on the ride. If you don't go and hold their hand, you know, if you don't come and meet them where they are, and it's not dumbing down, it's really just tutoring, gather some, some intelligence that they don't have. We all have our own strengths. We all have our own gifts and our spaces, right? So in your space, and your wordsmithing and all that. I might not be as strong. And so this is me coming to you and you helping me just glean a little bit of that. Nicole: Yeah, yeah. I find that with SEO, if I start if I start spitting SEO and people, they're just like, yeah, I need a website. I need a website. And it's got to have words and see that's I don't know if you have to do this. But in when you start talking about SEO, it's like, I want you to understand that when people go to Google, if they don't already know you, they're not typing in the name of your business. So

RJ:

What you need to have them do or what you need to do is to have the words that they're typing in be the words that are on your website and I think when you when you start saying it like that they're like Wait, you're right majority of the Earth is not googling me you know?

Nicole:

Well until and I think and maybe we may disagree here we may agree I'm I wouldn't be surprised if we agree but like what I've been trying to fight against since I kind of started my business is the the broke up SEO, you know, the whole road. I feel like there's some Vineyard Vines t shirt wearing, you know, what's out there, you know, making money off of not just women but non binary people and, and people who are not in that in that bubble, making money off of them feeling insecure in some way that they don't know this stuff, and that they need to know all the things so like that That to me is a it's a problem that we in our both of our businesses are solving. I'm wondering if that's something you've tackled, and how you've done that. Oh, man, that is something I tackle client by client.

RJ:

Oh, man, that is something I tackle client by client. When I do that is to literally just put it out there like, Look, you are vulnerable. I'm not saying that I don't want to do business with you. But what you will not get for me is lies. I'm going to tell you right now, if you don't understand how the systems in your business work, how your language works, how all of these things are really what your business is, you know, everybody talks about brand position and brand identity. And it's hard to really pin it down. And I'm like, No, your business is the experience of all of it. And you're gonna meet I call this unfortunately, what is it the unfortunately named web developer, Dick, you're going to meet web developer Deke. And Deke is going to take you for a ride. If you don't pay attention, I'm not kidding. This is on my blog, you can go check it. But I'm like dig is going to take you for a ride, if you don't at least know enough to be dangerous, because there are plenty of people out here who are salesmen. I am personally not a sales person, a sales woman, if you will. And that's not where my strength is my strength is just telling you straight up, I can help you. And I will start explaining how and you will want me to stop that. So, you know, so at least then, you know, I'm a bit more genuine than the guy who's slick and wrote up and he's got on his, he's got his bottle of Dom in the corner. And he's like, No, I've literally met this guy, by the way. He's got his bottle down in the corner of his office. And he's like, yeah, I come from this sales background. And last year, I mean, we made $1.2 million. Well, how much does your clients make? Right?

Nicole:

So Well, that's the thing too is like the commodification like turning authenticity into a commodity tends to feel special. slimy, like when when you can tell someone's putting on to come at you in a certain way, we can reveal that. And I think that comes through in words. And in the way that we'll talk about this, hopefully in a moment, like in the way that you create those client experiences, because you're really co creating them. You're creating them with that other person. Exactly. Like anything else, I think is crazy. So let's, since I know your awesome sauce, is his system. So while we're talking while we're talking business, while we're talking business, let's talk like what are some of your go twos for staying on top of things in your own business? Like, are there things you do or use that you would be like, this is how I do it. This is not maybe how everybody should do it. But these are some things you should know. RJ: Okay, so I am a big fan of just being able to earn individuality like right. So what I do personally, one of my heaviest use systems right now is notion. It's...What I like about it, it's Yes, it's a workspace. And it's kind of all in one ish, which normally is a huge turnoff for me. But I like its flexibility. I also like for client communications and collaboration, that it is very much just kind of like a Word document on steroids, right? So people are familiar with it, and they can understand the paradigm. So we don't have to spend time with me trying to teach them how to type in the document, you know, we can get down to doing some business and working together. And I actually have had several clients that after we've worked together in this system, they're like, I'm going to start using this for my system, and that's a good thing and I'm perfectly okay with that. Not working for people though. I think another thing especially in my space is that people are so opinionated that it is very much Well, this is what I do. So I'm going to show you how it's worked for me and what's worked for me because it's the bomb calm, you know

RJ :

And my thing is I, like I said, I'm big on individualization. So instead we have different conversations, we're going to have a talk about what you're already using. what's comfortable about that, what you don't like about that. That way we can put together your system in a way that really works for you. And that's not to say that I only work with solopreneurs because I actually work mostly with teams. And the idea being that you don't want to be a solo solopreneur forever, and that it's actually a myth. Like you literally just can't be an entrepreneur by yourself. If you're trying it, you're tired and stressed out and just in a funk for life. Right? Right. Yeah, exactly. You're forever just stressed. So I really focus on let's work on putting it together for you. That way, you can be a better director because you know exactly what you don't want to do. Like this is the way this works for me. And I need somebody who's experienced with these platforms because a lot of times I encounter people who are like, there's something that my website's in and I have the email marketing, but I don't really you know what I mean? And we're having that conversation, you're not empowered, you're kind of, again vulnerable. So you're just going I need to hire somebody to fix this thing, because whoever I had doing it before is for whatever reason gone, and that's that's not a good way to go because you're desperate. You know. I do try to relieve desperation.

Nicole :

Well, and that's the other thing too is I mean, I don't I don't know if if this resonates with anyone who's listening, but when I started my business, I had like seven apps or tools or tricks or things that I was using to accomplish maybe 123.

Nicole:

It was like, Oh, wait, where did all the Where did all the income go? Oh, it went to pay for my monthly subscription to these 72 things?

RJ :

Yeah, no, I am all about Bossing on a budget also, like First of all, eliminate some of those things. But second of all, if a company doesn't let me, let me think about my thoughts on this, because I'm a very big fan like something AI is all over the place for me is I love free stuff that is so awesome. I pay for it, like notion that I use, they have a very robust free plan. I pay for it. Trello robust free plan. I'm an annual subscriber, you know, so different systems. I like that they have a robust free plan so you can get your feet wet, you can learn how the system works. And then you can say, you know what, this is so awesome. I need to send off some money. I know they have to make their dollars, but most of the businesses that I do business with and that I give my money to month over month or year over year, they're established so they have very, very solid and reliable platforms, but at the same time When I go and I want to demo something, I can show a client and say, Look, see, this is what this looks like, this is what this could look like for you. Is this something that if you're in the middle of your launch, and your VA goes and gets like the flu or mono or something, you could still get the launch done, right? Because that happens.

Nicole:

Well, yeah, and even you know, when I work with people who build websites, and I write the copy for them, they're building websites, and maybe the person will never figure out how to edit that website. And then emergency in the VA is sick or the web designer isn't answering my emails, calls faxes. Yeah, there's what?

RJ:

Yeah, exactly. Like it's an emergency. I have this thing I'm on I'm on tap to make $60,000 and the price is wrong. You know, or something. That is actually important you know, and it's Murphy's Law. If you're right in the middle of something that is when if something is gonna break, its gonna break when you have a million people going to the site, it's not gonna break when there's nobody and nobody's paying attention, right? So definitely, I my biggest thing with clients is to make sure that they can get past that moment, right, preventing those moments to point like Murphy's Law is gonna be Murphy's Law. But if you can, like fine Oh, Shauna sees law or some other Irish

Nicole and RJ :

other Irish guys,

Nicole:

like just meander around this because it's, it's such a, especially if you are, even if you have a VA or someone else that you're working with, like in preparation for like launching the podcast even like I was trying to get people to sign up and then I realized that my CRM has three pages and it should have to

Nicole :

When it comes to signing up for the pod, and we talked about this, like when it comes to signing up,

Unknown Speaker :

right, like there's a third page, why is there a third page? But luckily it's it's it's been easy to navigate because I know how to use that. RJ: Exactly thing. It was easily fixable. Because Didn't you message me back? It was like 10 minutes later you were like, Oh, so here's what happened with that there was that other page and I was like, Oh, I didn't even realize there was another page. But I feel like there's there's moments when it's fixable. And then there's moments where you're like, you know, and I always wanted to travel and then you know where we are now. But I always want to have one I'm like, What if I'm in, you know Venice for carnevale. I'm not going to be texting RJ there's a third page love by the way. You know, I want to live and build these lives that we can't do that if we don't understand things. So I think that the unblocking of these systems is just going to empower so many people, so many women

Nicole:

Whoever, however you identify so many people. RJ: Exactly, just and just the unbro-ing of, you know, like the good old boys club of all of business literally. I'm definitely what is it the wise woman's club because nobody, no woman wants to be old or whatever. But the wise Women's Club I'm in, I'm all the way in, we should support each other and lift each other up, because nobody else is going to do it. I mean, we've got thousands of years of history proven, nobody else is going to do it. Nicole: Exactly, exactly. So when we talk about, like, letting go of the old way of doing things, I think that sometimes what comes up for people who have gotten kind of used to the way things used to work and the way things go and all that is, you know, this is my system, and it's always been my system and this is, you know, put me in the ground. This is my system, you know, right. Are there any like system as far as creating

Nicole :

A client experience and I know there's no there's there's individualization as we talked about earlier, but are there any foe paws or things we should avoid, like the plague that you see. And like it's nails on a chalkboard or something like that for you. RJ: Email as project management is my thing. That is literally the thing that I, you know, if you're railing and raging against the dying of the light, I want that to seriously die. And honestly, I think in that way, though, I think that's where having better software and the evolution of software has really helped. Because even my diehard people that I encountered that are like, can't I just email? You know what? Yes, yes, you can. We find a system that will allow you to just email but within parameters because it never fails that if you've got a group of people, anything literally above two, then what's happening is you know, threat

RJ :

And then somebody will respond to something up here, when we're way down here. So then you've got mixed missed, not mixed, but missed messages and mixed signals. And if you are a group that is trying to take action on something that can literally break it, that can break the bank that can break the company that can really harm all the things. So what you do is find systems that allow that one person to still be able to receive and make communications via email, but that will give us a better stream of consciousness. So we can move forward as a team, huh? Right. Well, and that that too, like I I've seen it happen in slack channels. I've seen it happen in other places where you miss one, you miss one thing and and so it's a matter of, you know, knowing your system, getting comfy with your system and allowing it to kind of cocoon around you and get you cold enough to take action right

RJ:

And see that's the problem with like, asynchronous even is the idea of being able to take action from there. So like, anything that you can do that will, and let's face it, slack is the big dog, right? So there's plenty of integratable stuff. And as long as you find an integration that allows you guys as a team to still have this conversation, but pull out the actionable bits, right, and play them someplace where you can actually say, Oh, this is a task. This is a item that needs to have somebody do something with it, then you're good to go. That that literally creates a better harmony. And as long as you guys are all aware of that limitation, boom. That's magic. Yeah, well, that's magic. And that's creative thinking too. I think that, you know, sometimes when we talk tech, and we go deep on systems, you know, we might feel like, Oh, this is very regimented, or this, but no, it takes a lot of creative, creative thought, in regard to strategically approach you know, structure

Nicole:

Right, approaching this problem, not thinking it's a big problem, but it's something I can figure out and then it'll be better. And maybe just some best practices like everybody if as long as everybody's on the same page, like I said, if you know the limitations of your systems, then you're running things instead of things running you, right? Mm hmm. Yeah, that's actually best practices was on my list. So I'm excited.

Nicole :

So like, I always think of, is it a unicorn? Or is that a horse? Like, are there things that you've seen businesses do where it's a unicorn only a few really amazing businesses are doing it but you wish it was a horse as common and as like, popular as a, you know, run of the mill, Monmmouth racetrack horse.

RJ:

Right, you know, so the horse that should be a unicorn is meetings, I think. And it sounds weird, because it's like, oh, meetings, what's wrong with meetings, the idea that you have to have everybody in you know, Your organization or in a team come together and have these conversations that most of the time are just status updates. So, and then it's like, not everybody status update is relative to everyone else. So you're literally wasting man hours and wasting time. And it's not that I'm one of those people that thinks, oh, we have to be productive 100% of the time, but how about we be more efficient? One hour or two hours each day and this long work in progress meeting that is not relevant to me, you know? So meetings because that is a place where slack and other tools like it could really shine, the idea of Oh, what's everybody's status? Is there anything that we need to collectively talk about? And just come talk about that thing? Boom, the meeting is shorter, it's more efficient. Everybody knows what's going on. And we can go on about our business. Yeah. And to I mean, I just trying to schedule a meeting schedule.

RJ :

Well, and then you know, if you're in a corporate culture where they just schedule it. And so it's like, I'm, I'm it's mandatory, I have to go show up to this thing. And I am sure I had other things to do, but I'll just schedule around that. I'll just be different from that. Yeah. So it's it's pretty bad. Yeah.

RJ:

Goodbye. Goodbye meetings, goodbye meetings, all meetings should be officially banned. Done. Or unproductive meetings should be officially bad. Yeah. Well, I mean, I think there's a big difference between a, you know, one hour every day of your lifetime sock and a 15 minute, let's just come together, figure this out and get get moving on this. Like that. I think that's where you were like that. That's I think that's what you were alluding to. So yes.

RJ :

The time suck can go This

RJ:

must be a What is it abolished? We must abolish it.

Nicole :

So we were talking about corporate culture and one of the things that I think a lot of people are probably trying to do is figure out what their business is culture, even if they're right now just them or them in a VA. What does that look like later? Does that look like? Yeah, so what has it been like for you to develop your business's culture? And what does it look like now? And can you talk us through that a little bit? RJ: For me personally, my business is myself and three contractors. And honestly, we don't, we have a not a Slack channel, we have a Slack channel, we just kind of talk and chat back and forth. We all have in notion, our documentation and we're very clear on our roles and we know what we're supposed to be doing. I have a water cooler area in like tandem, it's called it's like this little co working thing, but it's not very much we don't do meetings.

RJ:

Unless we absolutely have to. And those are generally check ins on very specific things. Other than that, we have a status update section where we know what's going on. It's very laid back though I'm pretty irreverent just as a person. So I don't encourage people to be all official, you know. So, when we've got a project going, we discussed what everybody is going to do within that space. And everybody goes to and does, you know, and moves on till it's done. Yeah. Yeah. Nicole: And then that frees you up to to kind of decide what your days look like, right? And for your people, the people who are working with you and for you to do the same, because I know you have you have some you have a couple of little ones running around the world. So yeah, yeah, I do. And and that's actually where that came from. For me, I used to very much be into like, Oh, this solopreneur lifestyle and I was the be all and end all for my clients. Like I started at the beginning of the project with logos and all this other crap and move them all the way to Hey, I got a website.

RJ :

I'm completely online. I would be doing social media, all that crap, but my youngest is autistic. And we were in the middle of nowhere Kansas. And it was like, Oh, I need to drive 30 minutes one way to get to his four hours a day appointments that were four days a week. And that started to become cumbersome for me to be like, oh, RJ, I've got a fire, I need you to do things for me. So that is when I really started developing the backend systems and the processes and some guidelines, you know, some structure around how I did business with clients, because there was no more of that. Hey, can you hop on this quick two hour meeting? I can do it. I'm so sorry. I'm unable, in fact, 30 minutes of this is drive time and at least 10 minutes of drive time I have zero signal. So I can't even have a conversation about this. So yeah, yeah. Yeah. So again, building, building. You know, there's a wonderful entrepreneur who's also in our group and her name is

Nicole:

Glenda and Glenda talks about building your, your business around your life. And I think that that is and hopefully she'll come on and hang out with us. You know, I think that's exactly what that is, right? It's kind of this is not going to work for me. Now, here, over here this shiny, you know, set up over here, this is what I'm gonna do. This is what's gonna work for me, tell me if I'm wrong because it happened before. But like, that's kind of what you do for your people for your clients. Right? That's kind of what you do for your people, right? Yeah, I work with them. Basically, to find the sweet spot. You hit it on the head. It's like, okay, and yeah, I talked to Glenda yesterday for a while. So fun stuff. But yeah, it's the idea of finding that sweet spot. Most people who go into being an entrepreneur do not do it so they can create another nine to five job. Although, what normally happens is that at least at first, you do create more like a six to midnight.

RJ :

Because you just don't know any better and you're trying to find that that headspace in the right thing. And so a lot of what I do is trying to cut through that and make that journey a bit shorter. Because I'm very much going to tell you Yeah, no, I'm going to be hiking with the fam on Friday, sorry, won't be working, not going to take my laptop with me. And I was that person especially at that time. When kid number three comes along and I'm doing that right I'm going back and forth but I'm still taking the laptop and still trying to figure out how that all works. And that makes for a very tired RJ very, very seriously put out RJ you know who is not eating right, not sleeping right not and really not making enough money either. Honestly. And I think that goes back to the idea of pricing, which I don't know if that was on your list, but it's definitely on mine. You know? Because if I know as women entrepreneurs, we tend to charge less and do more. It's it's that bro thing like the bro, bro is gonna be like I am your magical unicorn and then bro gives you a landing page when you want it in an entire membership site. And whereas a woman will be like, I'm gonna charge you for a landing page and give you an entire membership site. And that's not to say that all men are like that and all women are like that I'm not that general about it. But I mean, that mindset, that bro mindset, that's kind of really where that lives you're going, Oh, this magical program and they're going to teach me all the things and then No, no, that's not what happened. That's not what happened at all. You got some worksheets in two videos and you spent two grand and just the idea of Yeah, I at that time in my life. I had one client that I was charging $12 and 50 cents an hour. I was giving them 80 hours a week.

RJ:

What does that $12 and 50 cents an hour look like when I'm charging them $150 an hour? What does that enable, in my life in terms of me being able to not only show up for them, but to show it for myself? So, yeah, pricing boundaries, all of those things are important. And they all fall down to how you want to structure your corporate culture because you are the corporation or whatever. I mean, you don't have to be incorporated. But you're the business right? No, absolutely around your life. Yeah, well, and that to like that idea of like, even if you're not incorporated, even if you've been in business for seven days, you know, you you get to pick you know, you get to decide what that looks like. And you and I have talked about this offline but like boss leveling your business, right, getting to that level where you and it's not a level I don't mean it like you're playing Mario Brothers or something. Like it's not a level that you arrive at

Nicole:

And you're like, I made it. RJ check this out. You know, it's just this decision. I feel like it's more of a decision like, yes. This is it. Like a mindset. It's a place that you are as a business woman person. Yeah. Well, yeah, no more 1250 an hour John's like we're not doing that. Here's what we're doing. And and so I guess one of the one of the things I wanted to ask you about was your boss level VIP bundle, because I feel like that's what gets people ready to say that about themselves and honestly to themselves. So you could tell us a little bit about that. I'll drop the link in the show notes. But I want to talk about that for a moment because Oh, yeah, yeah, definitely. So I will tell you that was an evolution because I started out with all these high minded ideas of I'm going to build this program and it's going to be so comprehensive and do all the things that's back to that thing, you know, that mindset issue for me as an entrepreneur.

RJ :

I'm only charging you $1,000. But I definitely need to build your entire business for $1,000. And honestly, I'm still doing that. But what I realized from feedback with with the people who join the program, they were like, so I love these, these exercises that you've put together for me. But after you give me the stuff and you tell me, RJ, this is going to be or not RJ, but RJ tells me this is what I'm going to have for like email marketing. This is what I'm going to use for my CRM and all that stuff, then I kind of just want to go get to work and pause. So I took out all of the like, it's still there. And it's still available if somebody wants to work on their mission and their vision and their values, or they want to get really square on where they sit with their SEO and their branding. And also even where they

RJ:

They sit with their systems in general, like they want to take how tos and tutorials and do the little exercises. It's there and it's available. But it's no longer this mandatory, you know, every week, I'm going to give you these assignments. Instead, I tried to make it a bit more flexible. And so it's we're going to do a discovery session and make an action plan for your entire business and your entire front and back end process. You know, what are you trying to deliver as an experience for the customer. Now, here's what we're going to do to make that experience happen, right? That's just a nice discovery call. And then after that, we start working through the plan, we go, one meeting to meeting three meeting, going through your CRM, your payment systems, you know, let's make it really easy to get paid. Let's make it really easy to keep track of who is a potential customer who is an existing customer, what they need from you. And then let's go to work and let you know reveling your genius, you know, go do you be done with me. So. So it's very on demand, you know, it's not even like, we're going to work. And it's going to be these three days that you have to take out. And it's back to that point that you made about Glenda. It's, let's schedule this part around your needs and around your life. So they get my scheduler, they automatically can schedule all three of the sessions at once. Or they can say I just want to do this one. And let's get this payment system set up and out of the way, because I've got this thing I'm trying to launch right. And I believe that's it's working. I'm getting serious reviews. like everybody's like, oh, RJ, I made $1,000 today. It was awesome. I'm gonna see you in August after I get done delivering this thing that made me my thousand dollars today, you know? Yeah, and I love that too. Because it's like, okay, it wasn't that I came up with this amazing thing straight off the bat. It worked immediately and close the book, put it back on the shelf. Let's go. It was like No, I tried to do something.

Nicole :

I saw it right that I thought was, what needed to get done. And what I found from my people. What they told me was, this is what they really wanted. This is what they really needed. And then you co created that kind of that experience, but also that product that service. RJ Right, right, exactly. Yeah, well, because it comes down to review. And that's one of the things that I definitely go over with my clients is the idea of Yeah, you want to set some goals, but you want to actually take the time, while you're in the middle of it, to review and think about what's working and what's not. That's how you get to the point where your business is the system and the system is seamless and runs smoothly. You have to sit down and go.... mmmm... I don't know about that. And be willing to be honest with yourself like you're not always going to get it you know, I'm sometimes wrong at least once a year. No, I'm kidding.

RJ :

But you know, sometimes It happens. And if you get it wrong, be willing to just own up to it as a person. And I don't think it's anything because I know there is the tendency there to be like, Oh, if I tell them that I failed, or if I tell them that I was wrong, then they're not going to see me as an authority. Yeah, they are, they're still going to realize that you're also a human authority. Nicole: Yeah. And I think we've seen this not to get political, we've seen this happen where people taking ownership of having made a mistake, or misspoken, or just had a total eff up, we'll go with that, you know, and taking ownership of that and how that resonates with other people because we all make f ups and we all, you know, say the wrong thing or do the wrong thing or whatever. But at our core, if we're good and decent people can own that. And I think that I think that's important too, you know, I think but I think the other part of that is also this ability to let it evolve. Like just let this thing turn into another thing into another thing and not to put your you know, ostrich head in the sand and just be like, this is it. This is my Waterloo. This is what it is. RJ: Yes, exactly. This is the bridge or the hill that I want to die on right here because I'm going to stay in here until it's the cows come home. Yeah, all those mixed metaphors.

Unknown Speaker :

We just thought we just like made a word fruit salad and like, just toss them in there. But no, I think that's really important. So the last thing I wanted to make sure I got to was you kind of gave us you over delivered as usual. And I'm not even a little bit.

Nicole :

And I just I'm so grateful that we got to hang out and talk about, like we talked, we covered so much today we cover creativity and CRMs and unicorns and horses and guys, and when you're buying shares, we covered all the things. Oh yeah, web developer dig. Oh, yeah. All the things. So what I would be remiss not to ask you is if people are like, I love art,

Nicole/ RJ :

Jay, get out of my way, Nick, I want to I want to talk to her. How do they get in? How do they get in touch with you? I'll drop any of your social connections on the chat. But what's the easiest way for them to hook up with you and get get involved and get help and support from what you have to offer? I am on let's see, all the socials I am talking to RJ except for Twitter. There is a squatter on my talk, too, with the number two, so talk 2 RJ so the squatter on my Twitter, I would just talk to RJ I'm serious. He doesn't even talk about anything. Like it's better than the original one that I wanted. And which that was just RJ Lewis by itself. And that guy tweeted never once and still had it and all that. But yeah, so just talk to RJ on Twitter and talk to RJ on all the things including LinkedIn. My website is JustRJLewis.Com and literally anything I've got going on you'll be able to find there.

How Words Propel Your Business
Making SEO Make Sense
Creating Unbro'd Businesses
What Your "Brand" Really Is
Meet Web Developer Dick
Individualizing You Business Systems
Boss-ing On A Budget
Murphy's Law and Your Business Systems
The Wise Woman's Club
Rethink Email As Project Management
Choosing Your Business Tech Is Creativity In Action
The Horse That Should Be A Unicorn
Developing a Remote Business Culture
Boss Leveling Your Business To Fit Your Life
Womxn Pricing Our Work= Women Knowing Our Worth
Boss Level You Biz With RJ Lewis
Allowing Your Offers To Evolve
How To Connect With RJ